Translation Requirements and Professional Regulatory Bodies

In Canada, certain professions and trades are regulated to protect public health and safety by provincial professional regulatory bodies. This means you must secure the proper licence and/or certificate from at least one provincial regulatory body in order to work in—or even use the title of—that profession or trade. Failing to do so, can result in criminal persecution.

If you are new to Canada—and planning on working in a regulated field—you will be required to prove that you fulfill the minimum educational and training requirements in order to receive your certification. Every regulatory body has different requirements; however, it is fairly certain that you will have to provide copies of all relevant diplomas, degrees and transcripts in either English or French. If your original documents are not in English or French, you will have to have them translated. And those translations—more often than not—must be completed by a Canadian Certified Translator.

Here is a quick overview of the translation requirements for the 5 most sought after Professional Regulatory bodies in Ontario:

 

Professional Engineers Ontario

From the PEO website:

“If your academic documents are not in English, you are required to submit a notarized English translation as well as the original documents. You must also provide your detailed course descriptions (a syllabus) and an experience record for our review.

An official English translation of your documents must be certified by a translator from the Association of Translators and Interpreters of Ontario (ATIO) or prepared and certified by a Canadian Professional Engineer (P.Eng).”  

 

College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario

From the CPSO website:

All documents not written in the English or French language must be accompanied by certified English or French translations. All translations must be certified by one of the following:

  • A Certified Member of the Association of Translators and Interpreters of Ontario (ATIO). Translations completed by a certified member of the equivalent Association of Translators and Interpreters in another Canadian province/territory are also acceptable.
  • A Canadian Embassy overseas or a foreign embassy or consular office in Canada authorized to certify translations,
  • Translations sent by the medical school must be dated and stamped by the medical school to verify the
  • contents and received directly from the medical school with a copy of the original language document”

 

Ontario College of Nurses

From the OCN website:

“All documents submitted to the College as part of the application process must be in either English or French. This includes documents that come to the College directly from the official source (e.g., course transcripts should come to the College directly from the school that offered the program of study in question).

In instances where the College receives documents from official sources that are not in English or French, the College will send copies of the document(s) in question to the applicant, who will then be responsible for arranging translation of the document(s) by an approved translator.

If it is not possible to receive a translated copy of the document from the official source or a government body, the College will accept documents translated by certified translators.

All translations must be accompanied by an original statement from the translator that affirms:

  • the translation is accurate and authentic
  • the translator is an accredited member of a provincial association, society or corporation
  • the identification number and/or seal, name, address and telephone number of the translator
  • the printed name and original signature of the translator

After the translation is completed, the applicant must then arrange to have the translated document sent back to the College by the translator.”

 

College of Physiotherapists of Ontario

The College of Physiotherapists of Ontario provides a chart  that outlines the process and costs associated with becoming a physiotherapist in Ontario. Under translation, it stipulates that all translations must be completed by a Certified Translator.

 

Ontario College of Teachers

From the OCT website:

“You need to have documents translated if you received your education in a language other than English or French or if any of your documents (like a birth or marriage certificate) are in a language other than English or French.

For documents you submit yourself, such as a birth certificate, include the original translation with a copy of the certificate.

All translations must be accompanied by an original, signed letter from the translator indicating:

  • the translation is accurate and authentic
  • the translator belongs to one of the acceptable organizations (listed below)
  • their identification number and/or seal
  • their name, address and telephone number
  • their original signature”

All Health related professions are regulated. Other Regulated non-Health Professions include: Architecture, Chartered Accountants, Early Childhood Educators, Forestry, Geoscience, Human Resources Professionals, Insurance Brokers, Land Surveying, Law, Paralegal, Professional Engineering, Real Estate, Social Work, Veterinary medicine.

For more information regarding the different types of translation available in Canada, please check out our previous blog post here.

For more information regarding the Association of Translators and Interpreters of Ontario (ATIO), please click here.

And of course, we always like to hear from you at info@lorettamurphytranslations.com.

© 2016. Kaila Simoneau for Loretta Murphy Translations. All Rights Reserved.

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